Learning About Exoplanets

For generations, people have always wondered what life might exist in the universe besides ours. It has become a hot topic in movies, books, and of course, science.

Before even reaching space, humans have always hypothesized about “The Great Beyond” So far we have not found alternative life, but we have made significant progress. 

On major discovery is exoplanets. It seems pretty obvious that extraterrestrial life must exist on another planet, however before we can find life, we must find planets that can support it. 

An exoplanet by definition is a planet outside our solar system that orbits a star(1). The first scientific detection of an exoplanet was in 1988, although we have hypothesized the existence of exoplanets for over 100 years. 

Although we know have the technology to find exoplanets semi-regularly (the current number of known planets is almost 4,000), scientists are looking for planets in what is called the habitable zone (also called the Goldilocks zone). This arbitrary zone describes planets that are just far enough from their sun to support liquid water, but not too far to cause it to freeze. 

1920px-Diagram_of_different_habitable_zone_regions_by_Chester_Harman
An example of the habitable zone and a few exoplanets that exist within a habitable zone. Source

Of course, it takes more than possessing water to host life on a planet. Since, we only have one example to go off of, scientists are looking for planets most similar to our own. As of now there is an estimated 40 billion planets Earth-sized and orbiting the habitable zone of stars we have yet to discover(2). It’s these planets that we are most interested in.

In fact, recently a group of scientists met and explained how water should not be the only candidate for a planet within the habitable zone able to host liquid water. Certain geological structures are necessary to allow growth of organisms and proper collection of minerals that can give life a better chance (4).

With new discoveries and scientific advancements, researchers are also trying to unravel the mysteries of exoplanet geology. 

The research even has a name. Exogeology. This area brings together scientists from the field of astronomy, planetary scientists, and geologists together with the task to reveal what exoplanets look like from a geological perspective(3).

One of the best tools we have to decipher exoplanet surfaces, called the Z machine, has just begun scratching the surface in exploring exoplanet material. 

This machine is currently the largest high frequency electromagnetic wave generator, and its purpose within this context is to test various materials under extreme temperature and pressure  (5).

While we are not able to travel to exoplanets yet, we are now working to understand them as best as possible by working to create artificial environments we would normally see to try and discern how exoplanets behave.  

With more information, we can better understand exoplanets, and focus our attentions on those with the best chances of other beings. Perhaps one of them may write a blog with us someday.

As always, be sure to leave a comment with any questions. You can also reach us on Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr.

Remember to be curious, and stay mindful!

Written By: Cody Wolf 

Sources:

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exoplanet
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_potentially_habitable_exoplanets
  3. https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-017-07844-y
  4. http://www.nature.com/news/exoplanet-hunters-rethink-search-for-alien-life-1.23023
  5. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Z_Pulsed_Power_Facility

Featured Image: https://wallpapercave.com/cool-planet-backgrounds

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